Author Archives: DavUMBblog

<> Health Benefits of Donating Blood<>

How many situations in life are 100% win,…… win? How many situations in life do you have the opportunity to save up to three people’s lives while simultaneously reducing your own chances of heart attack, stroke up to 80% and even reduce your chances of contracting cancer. If you are a Christian or an otherwise moral person who cares for your fellow man, what greater gift can you give then donating blood? How do you show more love for your fellow man by the gift of blood? There are areas in the United States where surgeries have to be canceled because of critical shortages and blood. This is especially true during the Covid pandemic.  But blood banks are empty. Donating blood is so good for the donor that blood banks should be overflowing with blood and blood should be as cheap as water. Study after study has proven that blood donors live longer and have a substantial reduction in the risk of heart attack and stroke. Recent studies have even suggested that donating blood may reduce your chances of developing cancer. The question is ,”why are blood banks

still empty?”

I am very sure you already know the answer as to why our government, most medical providers are not behind this 100% and you can thank BIG PHARMA. There is no money to be made donating blood.  Blood is simply not profitable. There’s no money in blood for big Pharma therefore our government, the AMA and most providers don’t push it. They prefer statin drugs that do nothing but destroy our livers, and there is not one single shred of proof that statin drugs reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. This in and of itself should be a motivating factor to start donating.  Consider the fact that postmenopausal woman have the same risk of stroke and heart attack as men but premenopausal women are much less likely to have heart attacks and strokes than men. The reason is obvious why premenopausal women are 50% less likely to develop strokes or heart attack than men because they donate blood every month during menstruation

Study after study has shown the frequent blood donor (two times a year) have  33-88% lower risk of cardiovascular disease in blood donors versus non-blood donors. Repeated blood donation reduces blood viscosity, lowers pressure and the risk of plaque rupture. It is also known that each blood donation reduces iron heme up to 250 mg. Iron loss is known to reduce oxidative stress and the availability of malignant iron cells and have a positive effect against insulin resistance arterial sclerosis and may protect against cancer.

SAVE A LIFE. SAVE YOUR LIFE. DONATE BLOOD TODAY!!!

Bio Lab Flow Fluid CPT Q4206 Test Results Interventional Pain Management

The purpose of this document is to detail our experience on three patients with stem cell Flow Fluid at our interventional pain management practice in Miami Florida.

At the time of this writing, May 20, 2002 one flow fluid was FDA approved and approved for payment by Medicare.

We injected a total of five patients, including the owner and primary pain management physician in our group. Our doctor decided to have himself injected first because this is a brand-new medication which had not been utilized by our practice in the past. The doctor is a 63-year-old Hispanic male and on wen May 3, 2021 went ahead with injections in his left knee, right knee and right shoulder. For our example we will call our Dr. patient #1.

The second patient(patient #2) was a disabled 61-year-old Hispanic male. After receiving consent we went ahead and injected his left knee with 1 cc of Bio Lab Flow Fluid.

The third patient(P3) was a 67-year-old Caucasian male. After consent we injected his right knee with 1 cc of Bio Lab Flow Fluid May 12, 2021. A follow-up procedure of 1 cc was performed on May 19,2021.

The fourth patient(P4) was a 67-year-old African-American female. After consent we went ahead on June16, 2021 and injected her right knee with 1 cc Bio Lab Flow Fluid.

The fifth patient(P5) was a 72-year-old Hispanic female. On June 16, 2021, After consent we injected her left knee with 1 cc Bio Lab Flow Fluid.

In each case we billed CPT code Q 4206 and 99213.

Bio Lab charged $2000 per cc for the  Flow Fluid.

Our Dr., patient #1 did not bill insurance for his procedures.

Patient number #2 and patient #3 both were billed paid by Medicare.

All five patients including the doctor himself tolerated the procedure and the medicine well.

Despite all of the above a major problem developed. NONE OF OUR PATIENTS, received any relief from pain. Understandably our Dr. immediately began to question the “cost versus benefit” of the Bio Lab Flow Fluid and we reached the following conclusions.

Conclusions:

1. The Bio Lab Flow Fluid at $2000 per cc is prohibitively expensive.

2. None of our patients including the doctor himself received any relief from pain.

3. The doctor concluded there was a substantial risk due to the prohibitively high expense of the medicine for denials and/or other nonpayment from Medicare which would render the medicine as more of a liability rather than a profit center for the practice.

4. Our Dr. believed that the extreme cost of this medicine used in a higher volume would open the practice up to future Medicare audits.

5. Here’s where the story gets interesting. The most concerning portion for the practice was the fact that none of the patients received any relief from pain. The professional component of the procedure itself yielded less than $100 from Medicare and at $2000 per 1 cc cost of the medicine yielded this an extremely risky procedure. To counteract the low profitability and the point at which our Dr. became very suspicious and concerned was the fact that Bio Lab offered a 40% rebate on the medicine at the end of each calendar month depending on usage.

On July 1, 2001

our Dr. asked me to contact Biotech Laboratory personally to question their recommendation that we place the invoice price of the medicine in the equivalent of block 19 on the HCFA 1500 claim form. I advised biotech laboratory that our Dr. was not about to list an invoice price that we paid for a medicine where ultimately and in reality we paid 40% less because of the rebate. This seemed extremely unethical to our Dr. and myself. Consequently, we decided to discontinue using Bio Lab flow fluid and returned the remaining portion of the medicine.

ICD10 Coding Help for Radiologists

Icd10 coding cheet sheet for radiologistsClick to DownloadICD 10 help for Radiologists.
The Preceding link and free download is an excellent report with will help radiologists with the up and coming ICD 10 diagnosis code requirements. My suggestion is to download the attached report for your office. The listed report was generated from a large radiology group. The report lists ICD-9 codes and descriptions in the order of most commonly used ICD-9 codes and cross-references the diagnosis codes to ICD 10. My suggestion for radiologists is to again download the report, have it laminated and placed placed strategically throughout your office. Since the report lists the most frequently used codes at the top in descending order to least frequently used codes it should serve as an excellent quick reference guide to assist radiologists common ICD10 codes.
I have to take my hat off to the folks at Practice Insight for the above listed download which I think will substantially help radiologists with the upcoming ICD10 diagnosis codeing challenges. I have worked with all the major clearing houses and in my opinion Practice Insight towers above their competition not only for this report but many other factors. As we know, most radiologists are very busy and see many patients throughout the day. This ICD 10 coding cheat sheet for GI doctors should substantially speed up the office visits and patient encounters because in many instances under the new coding guidelines physicians may personally have to list the exact ICD 10 codes as opposed to the historical approach of simply handwriting or picking a diagnosis.

If your practice is in need of practice management software, electronic medical record systems or any other computer related issues please contact John Peake with Office Management solutions at 813-963-5582.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact David at 954-370-1053 extension 2201

ICD 10 Coding Help for Ophthalmologists

click Here for ICD10 Coding Cheet Sheet for OphthalmologistsClick to Download
ICD 10 help for ophthalmologists
The Preceding link and free download is an excellent report with will help ophthalmologists with the up and coming ICD 10 diagnosis code requirements. My suggestion is to download the attached report for your office. The listed report was generated from a GI group. The report lists ICD-9 codes and descriptions in the order of most commonly used ICD-9 codes and cross-references the diagnosis codes to ICD 10. My suggestion for Pain management doctors is to again download the report, have it laminated and placed placed strategically throughout your office. Since the report lists the most frequently used codes at the top in descending order to least frequently used codes it should serve as an excellent quick reference guide to assist ophthalmologists common ICD10 codes.
I have to take my hat off to the folks at Practice Insight for the above listed download which I think will substantially help ophthalmologists with the upcoming ICD10 diagnosis codeing challenges. I have worked with all the major clearing houses and in my opinion Practice Insight towers above their competition not only for this report but many other factors. As we know, most ophthalmologists are very busy and see many patients throughout the day. This ICD 10 coding cheat sheet for GI doctors should substantially speed up the office visits and patient encounters because in many instances under the new coding guidelines physicians may personally have to list the exact ICD 10 codes as opposed to the historical approach of simply handwriting or picking a diagnosis.

If your practice is in need of practice management software, electronic medical record systems or any other computer related issues please contact John Peake with Office Management solutions at 813-963-5582.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact David at 954-370-1053 extension 2201

ICD10 Help for Gastroenterologists

ICD 10 help for gastroenterologists
The Preceding link and free download is an excellent report with will help gastroenterologists with the up and coming ICD 10 diagnosis code requirements. My suggestion is to download the attached report for your office. The listed report was generated from a GI group. The report lists ICD-9 codes and descriptions in the order of most commonly used ICD-9 codes and cross-references the diagnosis codes to ICD 10. My suggestion for Pain management doctors is to again download the report, have it laminated and placed placed strategically throughout your office. Since the report lists the most frequently used codes at the top in descending order to least frequently used codes it should serve as an excellent quick reference guide to assist gastroenterologists common ICD10 codes.
I have to take my hat off to the folks at Practice Insight for the above listed download which I think will substantially help gastroenterologists with the upcoming ICD10 diagnosis codeing challenges. I have worked with all the major clearing houses and in my opinion Practice Insight towers above their competition not only for this report but many other factors. As we know, most gastroenterologists are very busy and see many patients throughout the day. This ICD 10 coding cheat sheet for GI doctors should substantially speed up the office visits and patient encounters because in many instances under the new coding guidelines physicians may personally have to list the exact ICD 10 codes as opposed to the historical approach of simply handwriting or picking a diagnosis.

If your practice is in need of practice management software, electronic medical record systems or any other computer related issues please contact John Peake with Office Management solutions at 813-963-5582.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact David at 954-370-1053 extension 2201

ICD 10 coding Help for Dermotologists

ICD 10 Coding help for DertomologistsClick to Download

ICD 10 coding Help for Dermotologists
The Preceding link and free download is an excellent report with will help dermatologists with the up and coming ICD 10 diagnosis code requirements. My suggestion is to download the attached report for your office. The listed report was generated from a large dermatology group. The report lists ICD-9 codes and descriptions in the order of most commonly used ICD-9 codes and cross-references the diagnosis codes to ICD 10. My suggestion for dermatologists is to again download the report, have it laminated and placed placed strategically throughout your office. Since the report lists the most frequently used codes at the top in descending order to least frequently used codes it should serve as an excellent quick reference guide to assist dermatologists with ICD 10 coding.

I have to take my hat off to the folks at Practice Insight for the above listed download which I think will substantially help dermatologists with the upcoming ICD 10 diagnosis codeing challenges. I have worked with all the major clearing houses and in my opinion Practice Insight towers above their competition not only for this report but many other factors. As we know, most dermatologists are very busy and see many patients throughout the day. This ICD 10 coding cheat sheet for dermatologists should substantially speed up the office visits and patient encounters because in many instances under the new coding guidelines physicians may personally have to list the exact ICD 10 codes as opposed to the historical approach of simply handwriting or picking a diagnosis.
If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact David at 954-370-1053 extension 2201

ICD 10 Coding Help for Anesthesiologists

click here to download ICD10 Cheet sheetClick to Download
I really have to take my hat off to the folks at Practice Insight for the above listed report. Many of my doctors have called to personally thank me for this ICD10 report and they emphasized stress relief and greatly increased clarity about how to handle ICD 10. I have used all the major clearing houses during my career. This report is just one of the many reasons why Practice Insight towers over all the other clearinghouses. I cannot recommend Practice Insight highly enough for this report and many other fantastic services they offer.
The Preceding is an excellent report with will help anesthesiologists with the up and coming ICD 10 diagnosis code requirements. My suggestion is to download the attached report for your office. The listed report was generated from a large 12 doctor ASC based anesthesiology group. The report lists ICD-9 codes and descriptions in the order of most commonly used ICD-9 codes and cross-references the diagnosis codes to ICD 10. My suggestion for anesthesiologists is to again download the report, have it laminated and placed placed strategically throughout your office. Since the report lists the most frequently used codes at the top in descending order to least frequently used codes it should serve as an excellent quick reference guide to assist anesthesiologists with ICD 10 coding. Please contact David at 1.800.811.1882 extension 2201 if you have any questions.

There also seems to be quite a bit of confusion in some circles about whether or not anesthesiologists will be provided with the appropriate ICD 10 codes from the facility itself. This may or may not be the case in many instances. This creates a particular burden for anesthesia diagnosis coding going forward. We are hearing reports that some surgeon groups are not going to provide facilities with the specific ICD 10 code itself. Rather, they plan to simply use the written diagnosis as they have in the past. This provides additional challenges. There are many more ICD 10 codes that doctors have to choose from now. The handwritten diagnosis may or may not be sufficient. All of this is the reason why we have provided the free download for your convenience and we sincerely hope this report greatly assists anesthesiologists with your ICD 10 coding needs. In the end, we will all get through this hurdle just like we always do. It’s just going to be one more challenge facing us in medicine.

Important Information for Pain Management Physicians on ICD 10

Common idc10 codes for painmanagement physicians
ICD 10 help for pain management doctors.Click to Download
The Preceding link and free download is an excellent report with will help Pain Management Physicians with the up and coming ICD 10 diagnosis code requirements. My suggestion is to download the attached report for your office. The listed report was generated from a large pain management physician group. The report lists ICD-9 codes and descriptions in the order of most commonly used ICD-9 codes and cross-references the diagnosis codes to ICD 10. My suggestion for Pain management doctors is to again download the report, have it laminated and placed placed strategically throughout your office. Since the report lists the most frequently used codes at the top in descending order to least frequently used codes it should serve as an excellent quick reference guide to assist Pain management physicianscommon idc10 codes for painmanagement physicians with ICD 10 coding.
I have to take my hat off to the folks at Practice Insight for the above listed download which I think will substantially help pain management physicians with the upcoming ICD 10 diagnosis codeing challenges. I have worked with all the major clearing houses and in my opinion Practice Insight towers above their competition not only for this report but many other factors. As we know, most pain management physicians are very busy and see many patients throughout the day. This ICD 10 coding cheat sheet for pain management physicians should substantially speed up the office visits and patient encounters because in many instances under the new coding guidelines physicians may personally have to list the exact ICD 10 codes as opposed to the historical approach of simply handwriting or picking a diagnosis.
If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact David at 954-370-1053 extension 2201

ICD10 Tips for Doctors

One of the best pieces of advice I can give to physicians about the upcoming ICD 10 nightmare is to check with your clearinghouse. Your clearinghouse may be able to dramatically simplify the implementation of ICD 10 for your practice. I have to take my hat off for the folks at Practice Insight. I’ve used all the major clearinghouses but in my opinion no other clearinghouse can match Practice Insight.

The program is called ICD 10 code manager. The program outputs the 100 most commonly utilized ICD-9 codes in the order they are most frequently utalized. Next, it cross references the ICD-9 code with the appropriate ICD 10 codes. This report dramatically simplifies the time it takes to select the appropriate diagnosis code.

I am advising my physicians to have their office staff laminate the report printouts and place them strategically throughout the office. In most cases, the reports are not as long as you might imagine.

Everyone in the industry is really struggling with ICD 10. It does not appear that most practices are adequately prepared. This is extremely important because on October 1 practices that are not prepared will be blindsided by the difficulty in selecting the correct codes. In many cases, doctors will no longer be able to rely on their staff or a billing company to choose the correct codes as they have done in the past. Physicians in many cases will have to personally choose the ICD 10 code itself which could be a time-consuming process. The practice insight ICD 10 report greatly speeds up and enhances the process of selecting the correct diagnosis code. I highly recommend Practice Insight for the above listed report and many other features of the Practice Insight clearinghouse.

Only 6 Health Insurance Companies Left in the United States after Obama Care?

As you may or may not recall, one of the signature keynotes of Obama-Care was that the, “state exchanges” would open up a pathway for insurance companies all across America to compete with one another. The natural economics of competition would help reduce premiums.

Really?

Typically, if you believe the exact opposite of what the government says is going to happen, you’ll be right 99% of the time.

After careful research I think it is fair to say- post Obama Care, there are effectively only six health insurance companies remaining in America. What happened to the competition?

Excluding Medicare and Medicaid, the primary 6 remaining health insurance companies are as follows: Due to the massive size of Blue Cross Blue Shield and United Healthcare, one could make a logical argument that there are only two remaining carriers , but this opinion remains pure conjecture.

THE BIG 6:

1. Blue Cross Blue Shield
2. United healthcare
3. CIGNA
4. Humana
5. Assurant?
6.Aetna

While there are smaller state specific, or “niche” health insurance companies, for example Av-Med, (In Florida), by and large almost every other health insurance company in America is one flavor or another of the big six. In other words, Av-Med is not competing on healthcare exchanges for the most part another states. Most of the carriers listed below who are not owned by the big six are either small players, specialized markets and or Medicare supplement plans.

Prior to the implementation of The Unaffordable Healthcare Act, the following is a fairly comprehensive list of major health insurance companies operating in the US. As you can see after the Affordable Care Act, competition has dramatically decreased.

I have added in parentheses the actual owner of the following major health insurance players and you’ll get my point very quickly. THERE IS NO MEANINGFUL COMPETITION amongst health insurance companies, post Obama Care. It is also noteworthy to mention that the stock prices of the big five have all nearly tripled since the passage of Obama Care This is corporatism at its finest.

• AARP(owned by United healthcare)
• American Medical security (owned by United health care)
• Aetna
• Amerigroup (owned by wellPoint, which is owned by Blue Cross Blue Shield)
• Anthem(owned by Blue Cross Blue Shield)
• Assurant
• Blue Cross Blue Shield
• Cambia Health Solutions (Blue Cross Blue Shield)
• CIGNA
• Coventry Healthcare (United healthcare)
• Emblem Health
• Fortis (Assurant)
• Golden rule insurance company (United healthcare)
• GHI
• Health Net (United healthcare)
• Health Partners (owned by CIGNA)
• Health Spring (owned by CIGNA)
• Humana
• Independence (owned by Blue Cross Blue Shield)
• Kaiser Permanente
• John Alden (Assurant)
• Medica (United healthcare)
• MetLife (United healthcare)
• Medical Mutual of Ohio (Blue Cross Blue Shield)
• Molina Healthcare
• Primera (Blue Cross Blue Shield)
• Preferred Care Partners (United healthcare)
• Principal Financial Group
• State Farm
• Travelers (United healthcare)
• United healthcare
• Unicare (Blue Cross Blue Shield)
• Universal American Corporation
• Well Care Health Plans
• Well point (Blue Cross Blue Shield)
*** when I use the phrase, “owned” I mean owned, managed, administered, or a subsidiary.